Friday, July 26, 2013

3D Printer For Your Next Piece Of Jewelry

Chuck Hull in 1984 created first working 3D printer. It's a process of making a three-dimensional solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes.  Imagine a machine that could disassemble old unwanted objects, and use the materials to print new objects — all in the comfort of your own home. Though the technology is 30 years old, it has now come into light due to falling price of the printer.

Recently people began to use 3D printers for creating anything they like, this includes  iPad stands, guitars , board games, shoes and clothes, jewelry, even guns. You just need to design the product you want on computer and just print it in 3-D printer. You can refer below video on how 3D Printing works by  Marina Mellinas.
It’s still rather niche, but 3D printers just got backing from one of the biggest vanity items around – jewelry. 

Making jewelry with a 3D printer is important to the overall 3D printer ecosystem. The main benefit of manufacturing jewelry through 3D printing is that companies can make custom jewelry for clients for low cost. 

Jewelry with minute and filigree designs require a workshop where liquefied metal are pored into molds and costs Dollars$$$, whereas the same piece of jewelry can be prepared with comparatively low cost using these printers. Although the resulting pieces often appear to be complex, the process of their creation did not need to be time-consuming.

The use of 3-D printing to make really precise, miniature pieces of items in jewelry, and availability of mass production, may also drive up interest for 3D printing among the average consumer thus leading to even faster adoption.

3D- Printing technology have also proved as boon for fashion lovers, it helps designers turn intangible ideas into tangible attire by giving them a means to create their dreams.
Dutch designer Iris van Herpen debuted two 3D-printed outfits, a dress and cape/skirt combo in Paris Fashion Week this year. She did it in 2010 and again in 2011.

Not only fashion and Jewelry industry, 3D- Printing is spreading it's roots in almost every field and the day is not far when it will become hard to imagine what else is 3-D printing good for !

Saturday, July 6, 2013

Argyle ‘Phoenix’ red diamond

DIAMONDS don’t just come in all shapes and sizes: they come in a rainbow of colors.
The world’s third largest miner behind Japan and the United States, Rio Tinto’s Argyle Pink Diamonds surprised the gem world when they announced about their entire collection of 64 red, pink, dark gray-blue, orangy-pink and purple-colored diamonds, including three certified natural fancy red diamonds found in Rio Tinto’s Argyle diamond mine in Western Australia.

The largest of three Argyle ‘Phoenix’ red diamond, is one of the world’s rarest gems weighted 1.56-carat and can pare several million dollars.

 Josephine Johnson, manager of Rio Tinto’s Argyle Pink Diamonds, holds the Argyle ‘Phoenix’ red diamond, 
one of the world’s rarest gems, during a private viewing at a Sydney hotel May 17, 2013.

“Since mining began in 1983 only six diamonds certified as Fancy Red by the Gemological Institute of America have been presented for sale at the annual tender,” Argyle Pink Diamonds manager Josephine Johnson said.

“This is the largest red that has ever come from the Argyle diamond mine, To have three of these red diamonds on one tender is a very special moment in time.” said Josephine Johnson, manager of Argyle Pink Diamonds during a private viewing at a Sydney hotel May 17, 2013

These diamonds are included in 2013 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender – the first time in the 30-year history of the exclusive sale that it has included three red stones.

Tender viewing of this year’s collection will be held in Perth and Hong Kong, with previews in Sydney, New York and Tokyo. Bidding for the diamonds opens in August and closes in October.